Persephone Pants | The Hype is Very Real

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I’m late to the Persephone Pants party, but I’m glad I came – the hype is very, very real. Anna drew inspiration from 1940’s sailor pants by including a super high waist, waistband inseam pockets, a button fly, and the design element that explodes most people’s heads: no side seams.

For me, one of the most appealing things about the pattern is how similar they are to highly coveted RTW sailor pants. Instead of paying $400, I could make a pair for under $40. Don’t get me wrong – I love supporting small women-run businesses and that $400 price point makes sense, but if the option to make it myself is there, I’ll take it! Also, the instructions are so stellar I’m certain a novice sewist could make them!

Shortly after the pattern was released, I did give it a go, but they just didn’t work out. My waist measurement ranges from 26.5″ to 27.5″ and my hip measurement ranges from 37″ to 38″. Even though that put me somewhere between a size 2-ish to a 6, I settled on cutting out a size 4 (waist 27″, hip 37″). They came together really quickly, but once I put them on, I had a bad case of dumpy butt. They were just too big.

I wasn’t entirely sure what the issue was; Was it fit? Fabric choice? Both? Was it an actual dumpy butt? I suspected the cheap bull denim I bought at Joann Fabrics may have grown, but in an effort to salvage them I tried taking in the back seam and crotch. Those efforts proved unsuccessful and I ended up setting the mutilated pants and pattern aside for a while.

After reading a couple folks had some luck with sizing down, I chopped my pattern pieces down to a size 2 and cut into some 10oz Duck Canvas hoping for the best. And it worked! I didn’t need to make any adjustments after sizing down.

Although I have a lot of love for this pattern, it is making me come to terms with how my body has been changing in my 30s. Things just aren’t as firm as they used to be. The lack of side seams and rear pockets leave your booty and thighs on display. What the hell type of underwear do you wear with these? Or do you just not give a damn?

I have fabric set aside for two more pairs – more 10oz cotton duck, but in black and some Kaufman speckled denim that I’m really excited about. I thought I’d hate the button fly, but I’m warming up to it and will probably keep it on future pairs. It appears I adjusted the position of the left pocket in the wrong direction (step 30), so I’ll be careful not to do that again ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

Hot tip: sew a line of stitching in between each buttonhole to connect the button fly and facing together (check out this Tessuti blog post for a visual). It definitely helps keep the fly from peaking open!

8 Replies to “Persephone Pants | The Hype is Very Real”

  1. Well first up…your Persephones look very good indeed. Well done!

    My measurements, particularly my waist, also has a ‘range’ and it’s sometimes a struggle for me to get fully on board when it comes to trying a new pants pattern.

    Your review, and your thoughts, are helpful. The Persephone pants are reminiscent of Seafarer jeans I wore (and loved) in the seventies. Back then, way back then, I didn’t have the same shape…and the shape I had, stayed put, LOL! I’ll have to think carefully before committing to these.

  2. Try coming to terms with your body in your sixties 😳. Your pants fit perfectly and are so flattering. I love the Persephones too, so no fears of the inevitable body changes when we sew our own!

  3. Wow, they look amazing! Love the fit and it really looks so good on you! Inspires me to keep on trying making really well fitting pants ;).

  4. Thongs thongs everyday! I started wearing the hanky panky lace one size low rise things and have been wearing them nearly everyday for the last 7 years. Aging sure makes panty lines so so much worse. Also, $18/ pair undies make me feel fancy. One day I’ll get around the sewing them myself!

      1. I was once that way! Now I’m the opposite. Haha cheeky panties work well too. They are like the gateway to things though…

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