Lodge Sweater | by Ozetta

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I love this sweater and I’m still kinda shocked that I made it.

This is the Lodge pattern by Ozetta. The yarn is Brooklyn Tweed Shelter in the color “Woodsmoke.” It’s very similar to my first worsted weight sweater, but this one I knit English style and my gauge is much more consistent.

I cast on on a flight home and had nearly half the body knit by the end of the trip. I only brought two cakes with me, so I had to stop working on it near the sleeve split.

Once I was reunited with the rest of the yarn, knitting the front and back panels went quickly. I was able to seam the shoulders together without throwing in lifelines, which felt like a huge accomplishment!

Visualizing knitting instructions has been the best way for me to learn. I wish more patterns included visuals, or even just more descriptions. It really does feel like learning a language. Ozetta is really good at responding to Instagram DMs though!

The I-cord cast off took a REALLY long time.

The slipt hem ribbing is so nice. The pattern’s sample photos really hide this detail and I was surprised and delighted to see them take shape.

I’m almost at a year of knitting! Last year, I assumed I’d try and give up again, but my wonderful knitting genius cousin, has been so helpful and such a big motivator! Thanks, Kristin!

Shop Pants | by Open Studio Patterns

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I made another pair of Shop Pants! The first pair was a wearable muslin that ended up being a little too big.

For this version, I made a size 2. Usually I write notes on the pattern pieces if I make adjustments, but I failed to this time. It’s clear that I shortened the leg by 1/2 to 1″ but I’m not sure. Overall, I think the 2 fits much more how I want them to, but I do wonder if I need to grade to a 1 at the waist, especially with denim.

I’m also wearing a newly made Seamwork Orlando that I hacked to have a crew neck. I used the bonus sleeves, which I also added 4″ inches to. I have another pointelle from Lyrical in a warm brown that I plan to make another long sleeve crew neck with. It’s a perfect winter layer.

Once again, I didn’t staystitch the waistlines after cutting everything out and things definitely got weird. I had to do a lot of easing to make the top of the pants fit with the waistband and there’s some puckering in the back. It’s not terrible, but I know it’s there. Next time (yes I have one more pair planned) I will stabilize before construction! I also only interfaced the inner waistband this time since my machine hated sewing the belt loops on at the end.

On my first pair, I followed the topstitching instructions exactly. I found though that I had some puckering right where I’m pointing above. So I decided to topstitch like traditional jeans and I really like how it turned out. The right bartack is kinda in a weird place, but it’s covering where I stopped and started to stitch the bottom of the fly guard down.

My machine got pretty mad about the belt loops last time so instead of making them 4 layers thick, I folded the strip in 3rds and serged the exposed edge. I like that they’re a bit wider too.

I forgot to change the stitch length on the waistband so the bottom line is 2.5 and all other topstitching is 3.20. Whoops!

I added another line of stitching on the zipper tape after seeing that on a pair of RTW pants. The rivets at the pocket openings and the jean button are from Blackbird and the denim is Robert Kaufman’s bleached denim.

I’ve worn them every day this week and can’t wait to make another pair!

Folk Garden Quilt Blocks | by Farm & Folk

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Farm & Folk recently put out a call for testers for this beautiful quilt. This project is so cool – Sara is a farmer and she spent the summer growing and harvesting dye flowers. She designed this quilt and a dye kit to go with it so you can make one too.

I was a lucky tester and got to make the two quilt blocks this weekend.

I used linen scraps and due to yardage limitations ended up with a very moody block.

The pattern is really easy to follow and included tons of Sara’s beautiful photos. I hope you’ll check it out once it’s released!

Some stuff I’ve done lately.

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WildCraft had a back to school sale, so I signed up for a four week introduction to oil painting course with Rachel Warkentin. I busted out my decades old oil paint and I’m having a blast. The last session in next Monday (sad face) and I’m hoping to start up an at home practice. In the second week we painted rocks and eggs. My egg and rocks are in the lower right.

Here’s the progression of some spoons. I’m most excited to have learned some less toxic options for working with oils. Canola and walnut oils are way less stinky too!

Sadie designed this fun top (there’s a dress version too) for Tauko Magazine. I got to make it over the summer and it’s finally cool enough to wear it! This fabric is from Anuprerna.

And another WildCraft class – visible darning with Erin Eggenburg. Getting to her level of skill is going to take some practice.

Here’s my hot mess!

I learned just how well WD-40 cleans and conditions metal. I bought this vintage desk chair to make my work from home space a little more comfortable but it was GROSS.

There was a long abandoned spider nest in the back rest and it had so much rust and grime. It cleaned up so much better than I thought it would.

First Worsted Weight Sweater | Towns by Ozetta

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I did it. I made a sweater with non-bulky yarn. It’s the Towns Sweater by Ozetta and I made a size M with Brooklyn Tweed’s Shelter in the color Fossil.

I learned so fricking much knitting this. I learned how to shape a neckline on a bottom up sweater, the kitchener stitch, how to pick up stitches, how to create a folded neck with a stretchy BO, math to adjust for row gauge, K2tog-L for sleeve decreases, the sewn tubular cast-off technique, and how measure and block a sweater. SO COOL.

Shortly before starting this, I learned how to knit continental and decided I would knit the Towns entirely in this style. I should have realized during the hem ribbing that my purls were much looser than my knit stitches, but I pushed through, hoping that magical blocking would smooth things out (that only sorta worked). Things got weird once I was knitting flat and there’s definite striping above where I split for the sleeves.

Joining the shoulders was where things got real spicy. I messed up both shoulders. The first one had what looked like only a small imperfection but I couldn’t leave it alone and once I snugged everything up, it turned into a giant, loopy knot. The second shoulder had a section where I slipped the stitches the wrong direction. It took going to a LYS to learn how to fix this mistake. I also bought some super thin cording to use as lifelines, which I throw in all the time now.

The neckline BO was a mind bender. It took a while to figure out how to hold everything and there’s a sliiiiiiight twist, but not enough to impact the wear.

My row gauge is always off, so the first sleeve I made was much too long. Thanks to math, I was able to figure out how many rounds I needed to remove to get the sleeve to be the right length. It was so exciting when it worked, but I did need to knit three whole sleeves to figure it out.

Despite having purchased skeins from the same dye lot, there’s a clear color difference between them. I feel like it’s less noticeable when it’s worn, but is super obvious when laid flat.

Despite its flaws, I am so pleased with this sweater! It’s going to get a lot of wear once it cools down.

Shell Tuck Orlandos

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I saw this post last month and immediately wanted to make one. Just like in the post, I used the Seamwork Orlando. I made a size 8 and shortened the length by 1/2″.

Lyrical Fabrics has a great selection of cotton pointelle, which I think might be deadstock. There are a few prints and colors I missed out on so I was quick to grab these “Lemoncello” and “Champagne” pointelles when they were released.

I followed Lyrical’s shell tuck / picot hem tutorial on their blog. I wasn’t sure if this stitch would work on the sleeves and hem but I haven’t heard any popped stitches yet!

I don’t know why but both necklines produced one skipped stitch on the same side so I had to hand-sew one “tuck” on each tee. I hope they hold up to wear… I think it might have been a combination of the foot straddling the seam and the needle not quite dropping off the edge. Skipping only happened on the necklines.

I used my coverstitch machine to hem everything and was delighted to find that the white cones worked for both colors and I didn’t have to rethread it. I sure do love having a coverstitch machine.

The cuts of fabric are unusually wide so I have a decent amount leftover. I’m thinking maybe a True Bias Zoey tank with the same scalloped edges on the bands.

Leather Sketchbook Cover

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I saw a leather notebook cover somewhere and couldn’t get it out of my head. So I bought a new tool and decided to make one myself.

I had a decent amount of leather leftover so I made another cover for a spiral bound sketchbook.

Shop Pants | Open Studio

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I haven’t made, or really worn, hard pants in quite a while, but this post caught my eye and I knew it was time to make some pants that didn’t include elastic. After I’d downloaded and printed the pattern, Open Studio reached out to offer a $100 stipend and the pattern in exchange for a review/IG post. They kindly sent their two other patterns since I’d already purchased the Shop Pant.

Based on my measurements, I decided to make a size 3. Aside from shortening the leg length 1″, I didn’t make any other pattern adjustments. Being out of hard pant practice, I knew I needed to make a wearable muslin and actually wear them to assess if I chose the best size, or if I just need some small tweaks to size 3.

After wearing them for a day, I think I need to grade to a size 2 at the waist and potentially shorten the front crotch (see crotch wrinkles in first photo). The intended fit of the waistline is high, but they fall down to my mid waist. Although they are VERY comfy to sit in, they’re just a wee bit too roomy.

Hello underwear!

I love the front pockets! They’ve got a fun angular opening and very deep, functional bags. Seriously super deep. My whole phone fits in there. I used a thrifted Indian cotton print for the pocketing and made it so the right side was facing the inside of the pants.

The fly constructions is straightforward, but I ordered a “jeans zipper” which is obnoxiously huge and kept getting stuck under my presser foot. If you want to sweat and swear a lot, order a #5 jeans zipper and you’re guaranteed a challenge.

The topstitching was interrupted by the zipper on both the fly extension and the fly front when I had to take the whole presser foot off my machine to zip it up. Quite annoying.

#5 jeans zipper (left), vintage zip (right). Look at how massive it is and this pic doesn’t even capture its girth.

I really love the barrel shape. I did an extra line of topstitching here to match the stitching on the butt pockets.

One construction step that I’ll be adding to future pants is attaching the waistband to the wrong side of the pants first, then folding it to right side to topstitch. No more having to redo the topstiching because you didn’t catch the inside folded edge of the waistband! Brilliant!

I do plan to change up the waistband construction a little since I didn’t get the crisp corners I can achieve with a different method. The right waistline must have gotten a little stretched out while I was sewing so it didn’t match with the band. I had to do some easing and got some annoying puckers because of that. Wild how it only happened to one side!

I really like this pattern and totally plan to make at least one more pair!

Textile Marbling Workshop

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After two years of only going to 100% necessary inside places, I cracked and took an in-person workshop. There were a lot of bare faces, but us masked folk all gravitated to the same table near the open the door. I didn’t realize how much I missed making stuff with other people until the six hours had whizzed by and I felt super energized. Anyway, I’m really hoping we’re all healthy after spending so much time breathing in a room together.

The end product of marbling isn’t really my jam but it’s a fucking fun process. Wildcraft provided a beautiful little booklet with instructions for doing this at home.

Each participant was given a cut of pre-treated cotton fabric, one cotton bandana, one large piece of silk, and an individual marbling tub. Each table also had a larger basin to share and everyone rotated through doing one large sample in the big tub pictured up above. I had so much fun playing I only took three photos during the workshop so here’s a short video of what the process looks like.

Marbling really forces you to let go – you don’t really know how the paints are going to interact with each other, or which colors are going to actually show up on the fabric. Most of the colors I’m drawn to weren’t very vibrant once transferred to fabric.

Knowing I was going to have a lot of small cotton samples, I tried to stick with the same colors so they could be used in a mini quilt project, which I started sewing immediately at home.

I decided to cut up this blue piece because the fabric wasn’t great quality, I didn’t think I’d ever use it as bandana (its edges were finished), and I needed something to bind the wall hanging with. All of my other scraps didn’t quite work with the marbled fabric.

I just pieced the samples together and did a simple stitch in the ditch quilting pattern. The binding was machine sewn onto the front then folded and pressed to the back for hand-stitching.

I added little triangles to the corners so it can be hung on the wall and drilled some holes in scrap wood to mount.

Sweatshirts | Daisy Chain Dale + Seamwork Lex

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I’m still very much in loungewear mode, so I whipped up these sweatshirts over the long weekend.

Seamwork Lex

This is the Seamwork Lex sans kangaroo pocket. I made a size 8 and reduced the length of both the sleeves and the body by 2″. The main fabric is a cotton french terry in the color ‘spice’ and the bands are a wide bamboo rib knit in the color redwood from Stonemountain. The rib knit is a bit too lightweight for this purpose, but it was the only stretchy fabric I had that sort of matched the french terry.

Daisy Chain Dale

This is the Dale sweatshirt, of which I’ve made three! See the color blocked one here. I made a size M with the long sleeves and no mods. The fabric is ‘maple’ sherpa and ‘toast’ 2×1 rib knit.