Roller Skating Outfits | #SewAndRoll

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I made this skating outfit shortly after ordering a pair of Moon Boots from Moonlight in 2020. It’s the Axis tank by Sophie Hines and the Summer shorts by Sew DIY. The fabric is from Spoonflower and I kinda hate it.

I didn’t quite get the fit right on the shorts, but I also think the fit is meant to be cheeky and that’s definitely not what I’m into when it comes to shorts. I’m a full-coverage gal, especially when exercising. I lengthened the pattern attempting to get more fabric over my butt, but it all pools under the waistband.

I made this skate ensemble at the beginning of May. It’s another Axis tank (it’s truly an excellent pattern) and a pair of Seamwork Mel joggers. For the joggers, I shortened the legs by 2″, added 1″ to the cuff length, and omitted the drawstring. I thought about testing out using a chain stitch (coverstitch) for the waistband, but chickened out and went with a zigzag. I’m pretty sure it would have worked. The fabric is a screen printed cotton jersey from North of West‘s warehouse sale.

I didn’t use my serger at all when constructing this Axis tank. I used the lightning stitch on my regular sewing machine for the back and shoulder seams, then reverse coverstitched them. I pressed the seam allowances open, but think I should press them to one side next time I use this construction method. The bands were also attached with the lightning stitch, then I used the narrow double needle coverstitch to topstitch in place.

Here’s baby me with my grandma who’s the reason I have any balance on, or interest in quad skates. She also made the pink pom poms on my skates.

The Perfect Sweater

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You know those makes that you want to wear every single day? The Marlo Sweater is definitely one of those makes.

This waffle knit and matching ribbing from I See Fabric are an absolute dream. The color is “Mellow” and I think it goes with everything! These buttons are from a Tub-O-Buttons in my former classroom. My students thought they were too basic for their projects. The only thing I changed up about the construction was stitching the neckband in the ditch with a lightning stitch.

My auto-buttonhole foot got stuck on the bottom buttonhole – I wasn’t following my no buttonholes after 9pm rule. The manual buttonhole process on my 770 appears to be different from my 530, and instead of sitting down with the manual, I just made a really weird franken-buttonhole. I’m curious to see how it’ll hold up with wear.

I’m also wearing a pair of Fremantle pants, a Solee top, handmade sandals, Fremont tote, and a bandana made from leftovers of this dress.

I made a straight size 6 without an mods. Since the ribbing is really stretchy, I cut the neckband using the 40%+ stretch pattern piece. I’m already making another Marlo out the same waffle knit and matching ribbing, but in the colorway “Rose Clay.”

Sewing Slippers

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I made this pair of ‘sewing slippers’ for work at the end of February and I can’t stop wearing them – they’re the perfect house shoe! Check out the Seamwork article here and watch my project diary video below:

I made a size 6 (regular shoe size) and they fit perfectly. The veg tanned leather is going to get that perfect leather patina too.

I have some olive green leather in my stash that I might have enough of to make another pair and I now have the recommended leather punch (pictured below).

2020 Holiday Gifts

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December is usually the time of year I get to see my parents. I skipped the trip home in 2019 because I had recently flown home to attend a funeral and had just moved. In hindsight, I sure wish I’d gone home.

I’m not usually a handmade gift giver, but 2020 felt very different, so I decided to make some small gifts for my parents, brother, and husband.

For my dad, I made a pair of Sew DIY Quilted Slippers. I used leftover Big Sur canvas for the sole, IKEA fabric for the exterior, and some leftover sorta quilted fabric for the lining.

I also made him an oven mitt. After a very small first attempt, I re-printed the pattern at 115% and made a second one. I had hoped to send a blue pair, but I didn’t have anymore fabric, so he’s getting one black and white mitt. My cousin has claimed the mini mitt.

My brother is a hard person to shop for, so I made him two napkins and one tea towel. This fabric is… interesting. Even after washing, there was quite a smell when ironed. I soaked them overnight in some white vinegar water, which helped. I’m hoping it softens with use because they are a bit crunchy.

I made a Fairfield button-up for my husband. I waited until the absolute last minute to start this project and it took a very long time to complete. I also bought the wrong snap setting tool, so he got the shirt xmas afternoon and the snaps as a “bonus gift” December 30th.

I’m really proud of the plaid matching!

I made my mom a Seamwork Drew headband. I didn’t snap a pic of the one I made her before wrapping it, but here’s one I made for myself. It’s a great, quick pattern and I plan to make more.

I’m also making her the Buckthorn backpack. Here it is in progress because I just started it last night. Yes, I started this 2020 gift in February of 2021.

In progress exterior. Needs lining and zipper.

I’m super curious if I’ll want to make handmade gifts next December, or if I’ll be able to get them done one time, or if travel will even be possible. I plan to cut out my husband’s gifts soon so they’re ready to go!

Piecing Together Fabric

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Anni Albers Design

My motivation and creative practice was all over the place at the beginning of the pandemic, but I found a lot of comfort in piecing together shapes. It’s repetitive, which allows me to zone out, but also provides some fun opportunities to problem solve.

For this project, I copied an Anni Albers design. I believe there’s a difference between knocking off for personal use and copying for profit. I think that when it’s for personal use, the act of replicating can be an incredible learning process and a means to improving your skills. Copying encourages you to assess construction and puzzle out how things come together.

I used 10oz cotton duck in Natural, Black, and Khaki. I need to find a new canvas supplier because the company I got these from had blue lives matter bullshit in one of its recent newsletters.

I had a lot of fun figuring out the blocks for this. There is one section that I would do a different way, if I were to do it all over again, but whatever!

Initially I had planned to use the khaki canvas for the border but must have used it in another project. I’m actually quite pleased with how the natural color border turned out. This color definitely made the stretching process a little easier – the wonkiness from stretching is somewhat hidden.

Some day we’re going to rip out this terrible 70s “update” and make the fireplace a focal point instead of an eyesore.

Scrap Quilt

Another piecing project I’m slowly working on is a scrap quilt. Whenever I cut out a woven garment project, I’ll cut 2″ x 2″ squares out of the leftovers. As a chronic over-buyer of fabric/project switcher, it’s making me feel better about the waste that comes with each garment project.

I recently made a small design wall for quilting projects. It’s just a 48″ x 48″ piece of homasote that I stretched cotton canvas over. It’s not as sticky as a traditional design wall, plus it’s right next to a vent, so stuff needs to be pinned to it.

If you’d like a tutorial for this, Farm & Folk has an excellent one.

Anyway, I started this project back in early September of 2019. It’s a nice long-term project that I can pick up and leave whenever feels right. However, my goal is to make 100 blocks and document them in my IG stories.

Initially I wanted to do 100 consecutive days, but I completely forgot about one day, then another… and then I felt silly about it. So now I’m just gonna call it a “100 Blocks” projects that will be completed in the time frame that feels good to me. I’m especially fond of these blocks. The pink seersucker is my first attempt at using natural dyes.

Quilted Jacket

The third pieced project I’m working on is a quilted jacket. I’m lengthening the Seamwork Easton jacket and adding hidden pockets.

Here’s what a single block looks like (above). I am using leftover wovens, plus Ace & Jig scraps with a black linen. I like how this project will be a reminder of past garment projects.

I’m leaning toward using the composition on the right. Maybe this jacket will be ready by next winter!