Sienna’s Sienna Maker Jacket!

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Back in April, Heather from Closet Case Patterns asked if it would be okay if an upcoming fall pattern was named after me. She said it wasn’t quite ready to share, but that it was “worker jacket realness” and “totes my jam.” And then she sent the flats and I about fainted.

I have been dreaming of making a chore jacket for a good, long while and this one literally has my name on it!

PATTERN: Sienna Maker Jacket by Closet Case Patterns

FABRIC: 10oz indigo denim from Stonemountain

SIZE: 8, view B

MODS: omitted the belt

I have a total of three versions planned and this denim one was made specially for the Stonemountain Sewists program. As a Stonemountain Sewist, I received a stipend to purchase fabric, sew up an indie pattern with said fabric, and answer a few questions on the Stonemountain blog. You can read all about why I chose this yummy denim here.

I have a natural bull denim set aside for view A and a beige canvas for another view B. The fabrics are, of course, from Stonemountain.

Up until this project, I had only used matching topstitching thread on denim projects. Silly me. Even though there are some wobbly bits, the contrasting thread looks so good against the indigo!

For the facing, I changed up the construction following Natalie Ebaugh’s Fancy Facing tutorial in her stories. It was a little awkward with the long facing pieces but I really love the clean edges. I will definitely use this method on other projects.

On my next two versions, I will shorten the sleeve a bit, probably 2-4″. I love the look of a rolled cuff, but there’s just a little too much fabric hanging out in that roll.

I’ve worn this jacket every day since finishing it. It’s such a good fall layering piece. I might add some antique brass snaps to the front closure, but I’m going to wear it for a while before I decide if they’re needed.

I love this pattern and I’m so honored to have been its muse!

Brussels + Bruges + Paris

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Spent a lovely week in three cities.  So much art. So many pan au chocolat.

There will be another post about my logbook and another about my handmade travel capsule soon!

 

Unsolicited Advice on Social Media (+ some inspiration)

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Along with everyone else, I’ve been battling a spring cold and have subsequently been pretty unproductive making-wise. Feeling like crap has, however, given me all the time to look at images on social media.

I’ve been hearing a lot lately about how damaging Instagram and other social platforms are to people’s sense of self-worth and productivity. Now I must agree that I may spend more time than is healthy scrolling, but other than that, I don’t agree with this sentiment. I draw so much inspiration from Instagram and the community on this platform has really helped solidify my love of making.

While being a sick blob, I marinated on the reasons I don’t find social media toxic and came up with a few tips, sprinkled with some inspiring Instagram accounts (all photos are linked):

Follow real people. Yes, celebrities are real people, but I follow artists and makers whose lives are more similar to my own. I’ve “met” so many lovely makers through Instagram – folks I can reach out to for making advice, and are encouraging and kind. Good people with good intentions make a social media platform meaningful and uplifting.

Quilt Inspiration by Jennifer Neil of @ersa.fibers

Follow accounts that share inspiring content. There’s a lot of stuff to look at on the internet. Food shots, make-up selfies, and memes don’t get my creative juices flowing, so I avoid looking at accounts based solely on those things. I also look for well-lit photos, process shots, and honesty. Making can, at times, be incredibly frustrating and it’s nice to follow people who keep it real (even if the photos’ compositions are pleasing).

Weaving Inspiration by Sarah Sullivan of @sullystring

When inspiration hits, document it in a sketchbook. It’s important to capture ideas, otherwise they fade. Anytime I see an image that sparks an idea, I document it in my sketchbook (or pin it on Pinterest). The practice of putting ideas on paper is very calming and lets me brain dump when I’m overwhelmed with ideas and inspiration. I love this Shinola Sketchbook, if you’re interested in starting a sketchbook practice.

Sketchbook Inspiration by Hillary Butterworth of @butterhi

Share your work. Think of social media as a motivator and as a means to document your creative work. I’m a stickler for only taking photos in natural light and my job/commute makes M-F making pretty challenging. It’s a goal to find the balance where I’m making something and sharing it every day.

Show Your Work by Austin Kleon

Happy sharing and scrolling!